Amazines Free Article Archive
www.amazines.com - Monday, November 30, 2020
Read about the most recent changes and happenings at Amazines.com
Log into your account or register as a new author. Start submitting your articles right now!
Search our database for articles.
Subscribe to receive articles emailed straight to your email account. You may choose multiple categories.
View our newest articles submitted by our authors.
View our most top rated articles rated by our visitors.
* Please note that this is NOT the ARTICLE manager
Add a new EZINE, or manage your EZINE submission.
Add fresh, free web content to your site such as newest articles, web tools, and quotes with a single piece of code!
Home What's New? Submit/Manage Articles Latest Posts Top Rated Article Search
Google
Subscriptions Manage Ezines
CATEGORIES
 Article Archive
 Advertising (133434)
 Advice (161172)
 Affiliate Programs (34757)
 Art and Culture (73748)
 Automotive (145650)
 Blogs (75222)
 Boating (9844)
 Books (17221)
 Buddhism (4128)
 Business (1329022)
 Business News (426383)
 Business Opportunities (366353)
 Camping (10967)
 Career (72752)
 Christianity (15849)
 Collecting (11638)
 Communication (115068)
 Computers (241942)
 Construction (38921)
 Consumer (49685)
 Cooking (17067)
 Copywriting (6653)
 Crafts (18205)
 Cuisine (7543)
 Current Affairs (20419)
 Dating (45889)
 EBooks (19696)
 E-Commerce (48224)
 Education (185303)
 Electronics (83507)
 Email (6407)
 Entertainment (159839)
 Environment (28927)
 Ezine (3039)
 Ezine Publishing (5451)
 Ezine Sites (1550)
 Family & Parenting (110929)
 Fashion & Cosmetics (196424)
 Female Entrepreneurs (11847)
 Feng Shui (131)
 Finance & Investment (310446)
 Fitness (106332)
 Food & Beverages (62917)
 Free Web Resources (7940)
 Gambling (30223)
 Gardening (25149)
 Government (10533)
 Health (629685)
 Hinduism (2206)
 Hobbies (44055)
 Home Business (91582)
 Home Improvement (251105)
 Home Repair (46177)
 Humor (4832)
 Import - Export (5453)
 Insurance (45105)
 Interior Design (29585)
 International Property (3485)
 Internet (191007)
 Internet Marketing (146476)
 Investment (22848)
 Islam (1167)
 Judaism (1356)
 Law (80453)
 Link Popularity (4595)
 Manufacturing (20857)
 Marketing (98998)
 MLM (14136)
 Motivation (18221)
 Music (27012)
 New to the Internet (9496)
 Non-Profit Organizations (4048)
 Online Shopping (129631)
 Organizing (7805)
 Party Ideas (11852)
 Pets (38069)
 Poetry (2234)
 Press Release (12683)
 Public Speaking (5635)
 Publishing (7528)
 Quotes (2407)
 Real Estate (126636)
 Recreation & Leisure (95398)
 Relationships (87678)
 Research (16170)
 Sales (80337)
 Science & Technology (110257)
 Search Engines (23488)
 Self Improvement (153226)
 Seniors (6236)
 Sexuality (35949)
 Small Business (49283)
 Software (83015)
 Spiritual (23475)
 Sports (116088)
 Tax (7659)
 Telecommuting (34067)
 Travel & Tourism (307866)
 UK Property Investment (3121)
 Video Games (13428)
 Web Traffic (11748)
 Website Design (56838)
 Website Promotion (36596)
 World News (1000+)
 Writing (35790)
Author Spotlight
ROBERT HOWARD

The Word of God is as, “Sweet as Honey”. God has Taken Me Through a Whole Lot of Things...more
ELLISEN WANG

I'm Ellisen, nice to meet you! Obviously you're here because you want to know who I am. Wel...more
ANISH SAH

My Name is Anish Sah, I am an Internet Marketing and SEO Expert, Social Media Guru and young Entrepr...more
CACEY TAYLOR

Im just a man who likes to be happy and see others happy. Im into home business, sports, family, and...more
DANICA EVANS

Danica Evans is an experienced author and online content writer. She has done her major in psycholog...more


First Line of Defense Against Flies by Theresa Flores





Article Author Biography
First Line of Defense Against Flies by
Article Posted: 05/31/2012
Article Views: 66
Articles Written: 1738
Word Count: 3080
Article Votes: 0
AddThis Social Bookmark Button

First Line of Defense Against Flies


 
Home Improvement,Health,Family & Parenting
Of the thousands of species of flies, only a few are common pests in and around the home. Some of the more common nuisance flies are the house fly (Musca domestica), the face fly (Musca autumnalis), the stable fly (Stomoxys calcitrans), the little house fly (Fannia canicularis), and several species of garbage fly (especially in the genus Phaenicia). These pests breed in animal wastes and decaying organic material from which they can pick up bacteria and viruses that may cause human diseases. In addition, adult stable flies (sometimes called "biting flies") feed on mammalian blood and can give a painful bite.

All flies undergo complete complete metamorphosis with egg, larva, pupa, and adult stages in their development. The female fly deposits her eggs in animal waste or moist organic material where the larvae, or "maggots," complete their development, feeding on bacteria associated with their developmental site. When the maggots have completed their development and are ready to undergo the next step in their metamorphosis, they convert their last larval skin into a puparium, a hardened shell within which the pupa develops. Within the puparium, the pupa transforms into an adult fly, which pops off the end of the puparium and emerges. Body fluids pump into the fly’s veins, causing the wings to unfold and expand and allowing them to dry and harden so that the adult can fly. The rate of fly development is dependent upon temperature, and under optimal summertime conditions flies may develop from egg to adult in as little as 7 days. Once the female fly has mated, she can lay several batches of eggs, typically containing over 100 eggs each.

While humans commonly find adult flies to be the most bothersome, the larval stage should be the prime target for control efforts. Elimination of larval habitat is the preferred method of pest fly suppression. By removing material in which the larvae develop, the life cycle of the fly can be broken, preventing subsequent production of adult flies. While chemical pesticides may be effective for suppressing adult fly populations in some situations, they are not a substitute for proper sanitation and aggressive elimination of nuisance fly developmental sites. Because flies can quickly develop resistance to insecticides, use them only as a last resort to obtain immediate control of adult flies.

The most effective and economical method for reducing stable fly numbers is to eliminate their developmental sites. To prevent larval development, moist grass clippings should be removed or incorporated into compost piles. Compost piles must be properly maintained to prevent them from becoming breeding areas for stable flies. Proper maintenance includes periodically turning the pile, which promotes rapid decomposition of heat-producing organic matter.

To protect dogs and horses that are bothered by stable flies, insect repellents containing permethrin or pyrethrins are effective, but neither provides long-term control; repeated applications every other day are necessary. Because the stable fly season is relatively short, this chemical repellent approach may be the most economical method to control stable flies on companion animals. GARBAGE FLIES Identification and Life Cycle

Garbage flies are a group of fly species with similar life histories and behaviors. Adult flies in this group can be readily differentiated from other flies discussed in this publication by their coloration, which is a shiny, metallic green or blue often mixed with some copper color.

Under ideal temperatures, garbage flies can develop from egg to adult in as little as 7 days. Eggs are usually laid in decaying meats (carrion), garbage, or dog feces. Similar to other nuisance flies, garbage fly larvae leave their developmental site to seek out drier and more protected areas for pupation. This behavior is responsible for the mass emergence of maggots from trash cans that have been sitting with garbage for too long. Garbage fly larvae and house fly larvae look and behave similarly, making identification difficult for the untrained. Damage

Like house flies, garbage flies have sponging mouthparts and do not bite or feed on blood. They are, however, strongly attracted to human foods and garbage and can make cooking outdoors difficult due to the nuisance they pose. As with house flies, they may be involved in the transmission of disease agents picked up from garbage or animal feces and subsequently carried to human foods. Management of Garbarge Flies

As with the other nuisance fly species, eradication of larval developmental sites is the most efficient means of control. Household garbage and pet feces should be placed in plastic garbage bags and sealed with ties. Garbage bags should be removed from the home at least weekly and placed in a covered garbage can for pickup by a refuse collection service. Garbage cans should be set out for pickup at least once each week even if they are not full because garbage that sits for more than one week allows for the development of adult garbage flies. Finally, garbage cans should be regularly washed out with soap and water to remove any garbage residues that might attract garbage flies or allow for their development.

Vertically hanging, sticky fly ribbons used to reduce adult house fly numbers will not work to control adult garbage flies; unlike house flies, garbage flies do not rest on vertical surfaces. Adult garbage flies can be controlled using inverted cone traps, as for house flies, but traps should be placed at some distance from the home or structure due to their foul odor.

Selective use of insecticides may be considered when sanitation measures fail. Fly baits used for control of house flies are not likely to provide good control of garbage flies because the attractants present in fly baits were designed to attract house flies rather than garbage flies, and therefore may not be very attractive to them. However, when placed on the ground or in containers where garbage has accumulated, some control may be obtained. SUMMARY

Almost all nuisance fly species are best controlled by eliminating larval developmental sites and reducing adult attractants in the vicinity of buildings or other areas of concern. Attractive material (such as garbage cans) should always be placed at some distance from a building entrance, and barriers such as screens, doors, and air curtains should be used to prevent flies from entering buildings.

Chemicals are only rarely required in residential situations. Their use generally leads only to short-term control because they target adult flies and leave the larval fly stages intact and capable of producing the next generation of adult flies.

For relevant topic, check the links below:

The most effective and economical method for reducing stable fly numbers is to eliminate their developmental sites. To prevent larval development, moist grass clippings should be removed or incorporated into compost piles. Compost piles must be properly maintained to prevent them from becoming breeding areas for stable flies. Proper maintenance includes periodically turning the pile, which promotes rapid decomposition of heat-producing organic matter.

To protect dogs and horses that are bothered by stable flies, insect repellents containing permethrin or pyrethrins are effective, but neither provides long-term control; repeated applications every other day are necessary. Because the stable fly season is relatively short, this chemical repellent approach may be the most economical method to control stable flies on companion animals. GARBAGE FLIES Identification and Life Cycle

Garbage flies are a group of fly species with similar life histories and behaviors. Adult flies in this group can be readily differentiated from other flies discussed in this publication by their coloration, which is a shiny, metallic green or blue often mixed with some copper color.

Under ideal temperatures, garbage flies can develop from egg to adult in as little as 7 days. Eggs are usually laid in decaying meats (carrion), garbage, or dog feces. Similar to other nuisance flies, garbage fly larvae leave their developmental site to seek out drier and more protected areas for pupation. This behavior is responsible for the mass emergence of maggots from trash cans that have been sitting with garbage for too long. Garbage fly larvae and house fly larvae look and behave similarly, making identification difficult for the untrained. Damage

Like house flies, garbage flies have sponging mouthparts and do not bite or feed on blood. They are, however, strongly attracted to human foods and garbage and can make cooking outdoors difficult due to the nuisance they pose. As with house flies, they may be involved in the transmission of disease agents picked up from garbage or animal feces and subsequently carried to human foods. Management of Garbarge Flies

As with the other nuisance fly species, eradication of larval developmental sites is the most efficient means of control. Household garbage and pet feces should be placed in plastic garbage bags and sealed with ties. Garbage bags should be removed from the home at least weekly and placed in a covered garbage can for pickup by a refuse collection service. Garbage cans should be set out for pickup at least once each week even if they are not full because garbage that sits for more than one week allows for the development of adult garbage flies. Finally, garbage cans should be regularly washed out with soap and water to remove any garbage residues that might attract garbage flies or allow for their development.

Vertically hanging, sticky fly ribbons used to reduce adult house fly numbers will not work to control adult garbage flies; unlike house flies, garbage flies do not rest on vertical surfaces. Adult garbage flies can be controlled using inverted cone traps, as for house flies, but traps should be placed at some distance from the home or structure due to their foul odor.

Selective use of insecticides may be considered when sanitation measures fail. Fly baits used for control of house flies are not likely to provide good control of garbage flies because the attractants present in fly baits were designed to attract house flies rather than garbage flies, and therefore may not be very attractive to them. However, when placed on the ground or in containers where garbage has accumulated, some control may be obtained. SUMMARY

Almost all nuisance fly species are best controlled by eliminating larval developmental sites and reducing adult attractants in the vicinity of buildings or other areas of concern. Attractive material (such as garbage cans) should always be placed at some distance from a building entrance, and barriers such as screens, doors, and air curtains should be used to prevent flies from entering buildings.

Chemicals are only rarely required in residential situations. Their use generally leads only to short-term control because they target adult flies and leave the larval fly stages intact and capable of producing the next generation of adult flies.

See more links for this topic:

The most effective and economical method for reducing stable fly numbers is to eliminate their developmental sites. To prevent larval development, moist grass clippings should be removed or incorporated into compost piles. Compost piles must be properly maintained to prevent them from becoming breeding areas for stable flies. Proper maintenance includes periodically turning the pile, which promotes rapid decomposition of heat-producing organic matter.

To protect dogs and horses that are bothered by stable flies, insect repellents containing permethrin or pyrethrins are effective, but neither provides long-term control; repeated applications every other day are necessary. Because the stable fly season is relatively short, this chemical repellent approach may be the most economical method to control stable flies on companion animals. GARBAGE FLIES Identification and Life Cycle

Garbage flies are a group of fly species with similar life histories and behaviors. Adult flies in this group can be readily differentiated from other flies discussed in this publication by their coloration, which is a shiny, metallic green or blue often mixed with some copper color.

Under ideal temperatures, garbage flies can develop from egg to adult in as little as 7 days. Eggs are usually laid in decaying meats (carrion), garbage, or dog feces. Similar to other nuisance flies, garbage fly larvae leave their developmental site to seek out drier and more protected areas for pupation. This behavior is responsible for the mass emergence of maggots from trash cans that have been sitting with garbage for too long. Garbage fly larvae and house fly larvae look and behave similarly, making identification difficult for the untrained. Damage

Like house flies, garbage flies have sponging mouthparts and do not bite or feed on blood. They are, however, strongly attracted to human foods and garbage and can make cooking outdoors difficult due to the nuisance they pose. As with house flies, they may be involved in the transmission of disease agents picked up from garbage or animal feces and subsequently carried to human foods. Management of Garbarge Flies

As with the other nuisance fly species, eradication of larval developmental sites is the most efficient means of control. Household garbage and pet feces should be placed in plastic garbage bags and sealed with ties. Garbage bags should be removed from the home at least weekly and placed in a covered garbage can for pickup by a refuse collection service. Garbage cans should be set out for pickup at least once each week even if they are not full because garbage that sits for more than one week allows for the development of adult garbage flies. Finally, garbage cans should be regularly washed out with soap and water to remove any garbage residues that might attract garbage flies or allow for their development.

Vertically hanging, sticky fly ribbons used to reduce adult house fly numbers will not work to control adult garbage flies; unlike house flies, garbage flies do not rest on vertical surfaces. Adult garbage flies can be controlled using inverted cone traps, as for house flies, but traps should be placed at some distance from the home or structure due to their foul odor.

Selective use of insecticides may be considered when sanitation measures fail. Fly baits used for control of house flies are not likely to provide good control of garbage flies because the attractants present in fly baits were designed to attract house flies rather than garbage flies, and therefore may not be very attractive to them. However, when placed on the ground or in containers where garbage has accumulated, some control may be obtained.

See more links for this topic:

The most effective and economical method for reducing stable fly numbers is to eliminate their developmental sites. To prevent larval development, moist grass clippings should be removed or incorporated into compost piles. Compost piles must be properly maintained to prevent them from becoming breeding areas for stable flies. Proper maintenance includes periodically turning the pile, which promotes rapid decomposition of heat-producing organic matter.

To protect dogs and horses that are bothered by stable flies, insect repellents containing permethrin or pyrethrins are effective, but neither provides long-term control; repeated applications every other day are necessary. Because the stable fly season is relatively short, this chemical repellent approach may be the most economical method to control stable flies on companion animals. GARBAGE FLIES Identification and Life Cycle

Garbage flies are a group of fly species with similar life histories and behaviors. Adult flies in this group can be readily differentiated from other flies discussed in this publication by their coloration, which is a shiny, metallic green or blue often mixed with some copper color.

Under ideal temperatures, garbage flies can develop from egg to adult in as little as 7 days. Eggs are usually laid in decaying meats (carrion), garbage, or dog feces. Similar to other nuisance flies, garbage fly larvae leave their developmental site to seek out drier and more protected areas for pupation. This behavior is responsible for the mass emergence of maggots from trash cans that have been sitting with garbage for too long. Garbage fly larvae and house fly larvae look and behave similarly, making identification difficult for the untrained. Damage

Like house flies, garbage flies have sponging mouthparts and do not bite or feed on blood. They are, however, strongly attracted to human foods and garbage and can make cooking outdoors difficult due to the nuisance they pose. As with house flies, they may be involved in the transmission of disease agents picked up from garbage or animal feces and subsequently carried to human foods. Management of Garbarge Flies

As with the other nuisance fly species, eradication of larval developmental sites is the most efficient means of control. Household garbage and pet feces should be placed in plastic garbage bags and sealed with ties. Garbage bags should be removed from the home at least weekly and placed in a covered garbage can for pickup by a refuse collection service. Garbage cans should be set out for pickup at least once each week even if they are not full because garbage that sits for more than one week allows for the development of adult garbage flies. Finally, garbage cans should be regularly washed out with soap and water to remove any garbage residues that might attract garbage flies or allow for their development.

Vertically hanging, sticky fly ribbons used to reduce adult house fly numbers will not work to control adult garbage flies; unlike house flies, garbage flies do not rest on vertical surfaces. Adult garbage flies can be controlled using inverted cone traps, as for house flies, but traps should be placed at some distance from the home or structure due to their foul odor.

Selective use of insecticides may be considered when sanitation measures fail. Fly baits used for control of house flies are not likely to provide good control of garbage flies because the attractants present in fly baits were designed to attract house flies rather than garbage flies, and therefore may not be very attractive to them. However, when placed on the ground or in containers where garbage has accumulated, some control may be obtained. SUMMARY

Almost all nuisance fly species are best controlled by eliminating larval developmental sites and reducing adult attractants in the vicinity of buildings or other areas of concern. Attractive material (such as garbage cans) should always be placed at some distance from a building entrance, and barriers such as screens, doors, and air curtains should be used to prevent flies from entering buildings.

Chemicals are only rarely required in residential situations. Their use generally leads only to short-term control because they target adult flies and leave the larval fly stages intact and capable of producing the next generation of adult flies.

See more links for this topic:

fly control northshore

Related Articles - pest control, ant control, pest control auckland, pest control northshore, pest control west auckland, pest control south auckland, fly control,

Email this Article to a Friend!

Receive Articles like this one direct to your email box!
Subscribe for free today!

 Rate This Article  
Completely useless, should be removed from directory.
Minimal useful information.
Decent and informative.
Great article, very informative and helpful.
A 'Must Read'.



 Author Login 
LOGIN
Register for Author Account

 

Advertiser Login

 

ADVERTISE HERE NOW!
   Limited Time $60 Offer!
   90  Days-1.5 Million Views  

 

Great Paranormal Romance


STEVERT MCKENZIE

Stevert Mckenzie, Travel Enthusiast. ...more
PAUL RICE

hello everyone l been on the net since 2000 and enjoy my work l work as an affiliate and also have w...more
DAMIAN POWELL

Demonstrated exceptional leadership in the government and private sector at an executive level. Skil...more
XTAGE XIXTEEN

My name is Kingsley Chihozie. Am from the western part of Africa, Nigerian. Am a graduate of Abia St...more
LAURA JEEVES

At LeadGenerators, we specialise in content-led Online Marketing Strategies for our clients in the t...more
CHRIS BURTON

I am an International Corporate Consultant specialising in the bespoke formation of offshore compani...more
TIM FAY

I am not a writer nor am I trying to become a writer. I am an average person with average intelligen...more
SUSAN FRIESEN

Susan Friesen, founder of the award-winning web development and digital marketing firm eVision Media...more
JASON NG

Jason Ng has a huge passion for the health and fitness industry as he strongly believes that having ...more
GENE MYERS

Author of four books and two screenplays; frequent magazine contributor. I have four other books "in...more

HomeLinksAbout UsContact UsTerms of UsePrivacy PolicyFAQResources
Copyright © 2020, All rights reserved.
Some pages may contain portions of text relating to certain topics obtained from wikipedia.org under the GNU FDL license